Side Scan Analysis – Sydney Wharves

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Side Scan Analysis – Sydney Wharves

It’s been a LONG time since the boat got wet but here is the latest side scan analysis.

This time we are looking at the various wharves and headlands around the Pyrmont area. The track starts near the Maritime Museum and weaves around to almost Anzac Bridge.

In total 3.2km of side scan tracks stitched together into a single image.

As per usual make sure you ***CLICK THE IMAGES TO ENLARGE***

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LOCATION 1 – PIRRAMA PARK AREA

This area as very interesting.

There is a long reef section (white circle) and some rubble piles (orange and yellow circles). The down scan also indicates that the depth varies from 4m through to almost 10m. There are a few fish showing on these views (bottom RHS of side scan image 5-10m out) so I will definitely come back here in the future and have a fish.

Check out the zoomed view of that object that isn’t attached to the bottom. The software is telling me it is 2m long!

LOCATION 2 – JONES BAY WHARF

White circle looks like it may be a car judging by the size. There are a few tyres and other bits and pieces of rubble around here too.

It always surprises me how much material is under old wharves. I guess plenty got dropped in during construction.

It was difficult to find fish among the pylons as I had the side-scan distance set very wide. If I wasn’t recording the images I would have tightened the view up quite a bit.

LOCATION 3 – BACK OF JONES BAY WHARF

A couple of schools of fish hiding back here.

Also a great view of prop wash on side-scan. I was the only boat in here but had to double-back on my track to get out. Travelling at only 4.9kts I left a considerable amount of wash behind. Without any current to disperse the wash it can hang around for quite a while.

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LOCATION 4 – BALLAARAT PARK HEADLAND

This headland has a small platform and wharf out the front. You can see a large school of fish hanging around the pylons.

More noticeable is the reef structure which looks like part of the original headland. There is a large amount of dumped material accumulated around this location. There also looks like some sort of collapsed structure sitting on the bottom. Combined with the big drop-off into deeper water this might be worth another look next time I’m back in this area.

LOCATION 4 – SYDNEY WHARF HEADLAND

Another interesting headland with plenty of material in the water. I’ve highlighted the front face of the wharf with dotted line. The pylons are casting clear shadows back to the shoreline. There is also plenty of material on the bottom underneath the wharf.

I can also see a hard reef section along the front of the wharf (orange circle) which has a few fish hanging off it. There are also a couple of schools of fish on the corner of the headland.

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LOCATION 5 – SYDNEY WHARF BARANGAROO SIDE

This location was the most interesting of the entire track. I’ve put a dotted line in along the face of the wharf. This highlights how many large logs are in the water around this location. The timber might have fallen into the water during construction. Or it may have fallen in back when boats were being unloaded here many years ago. It looks like a good location. This area has a lot of commercial vessel activity which makes it a bit dangerous to fish.

WHAT’S NEXT

So that’s my round-up of the Sydney wharves. If you found this interesting please subscribe to our Facebook page. We will send you updates when we post new blogs on our website. Also feel free to let me know if you have any areas you think might be interesting to scan.

EQUIPMENT USED

Sounder: Humminbird Helix 10 MEGA SI G2N
Range: 40m
Sensitivity: 10
Contrast: 12
Chart Speed: 4
Boat Speed: 4-5kts


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The charm of fishing is that it is the pursuit of what is elusive but attainable, a perpetual series of occasions for hope.

John Buchan